Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Scientia


298     -     299     -     300


Scientia
Iudice me, soli semperque perinde beati
Sunt quicunque sciunt omnia, quique nihil.

KNOWLEDGE
Methinks they sole are happy here below
That either all things, or else no things know.

Source: John Owen (c.1564-c.1628), Epigrammata, 3.134, with an English translation by Thomas Harvey. Meter: Elegiac.

The vocabulary is keyed to the DCC Latin Vocabulary list. There is only one word in this poem that is not on the DCC list:

perinde - just as, equally, likewise

beātus -a -um: happy, blessed, prosperous, fortunate
ego me mihi mē: I, me
iūdex iūdicis m.: judge, juror
nihil, nīl: nothing; not at all
omnis -e: all, every, as a whole
que: and (enclitic)
quī-, quae-, quodcumque: who-, whatever
qui, quae, quod: who, which, what; quis quid: who? what? which?
scientia -ae f.: knowledge
scio -īre -īvī/-iī -ītum: know
semper: always, ever
sōlus -a -um: only, alone; sōlum (adv.), only, merely
sum, esse, fuī: be, exist

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